Entitlement and Drug Addiction

Entitlement and Drug Addiction

Entitlement is the opposite of humility – not living outside your means, respecting others, understanding accountability and responsibility. Constantly getting your own way can create a mindset of entitlement that will cause an otherwise charming and friendly person to turn into a whiny or confrontational person if anyone dares deny them what they want. When entitlement and drug addiction come together, the result can debilitate the addict and frustrate their family.

Entitlement and drug addiction go hand in hand. Entitlement can both encourage the development of an addiction as well as keep its fire burning brightly.

A user who is already entitled can quickly begin to feel that they deserve to do what they want, including harming themselves through substance abuse. This entitlement doesn’t just happen suddenly; it usually develops through emotions from formative experiences.

Sources of Entitlement

Negative experiences- Negative experiences such as abuse, poor childhood experiences, loss of a loved one, can fuel feelings of being entitled.

Positive experiences – Inheriting a fortune, being famous, or simply being part of a successful family can make someone feel that they deserve to have and do whatever they want, including using drugs.

Aspects of Entitlement

Guilt and Shame – A person who is experiencing feelings of guilt and shame might find themselves developing a grandiose self-image to protect their inner most feelings. For example, the schoolyard bully usually has a reason for being that way: his inflated sense of self has been developed to protect his feelings of shame and guilt.

Pride – Pride can often be a person’s biggest downfall. For someone who has been taught to have a strong sense of pride either through their upbringing or their success, he might feel that he deserves to do what he wants, or feel the need to keep up his appearance. This idea can lead to the continuation of an addiction.

The Combination of Entitlement and Drug Addiction – the Problems is Poses

Entitled people who become addicted to drugs more than likely do not see a problem with their behavior. When confronted about their drug use, they may be indifferent, angry, or be in denial.

Treatment for Someone with Entitlement and Drug Addiction

There are treatment centers that cater to those with entitlement and drug addiction issues. These facilities are high-end with numerous services and amenities. They can provide for the entitled individual while helping them learn humility and coping methods for their addiction. Luxury treatment centers offer upscale amenities while providing the highest quality of treatment and therapies so that your loved one can be comfortable and therefore open to learning some of the uncomfortable things about themselves, such as entitlement and drug addiction. Remember, oftentimes people with a sense of entitlement can often be in great denial about their drug addiction. In fact, denial is a major part of addiction and is a huge stumbling block to getting much-needed help. By sending your loved one to a luxurious, high-end treatment facility, they will feel more at ease because they will have the creature comforts they are used to having. This approach of luxury accommodations and real world therapy is ideal because they will then be more open-minded as well as less distracted and therefore treatment will have a greater chance to be successful.

 

 

 

 

Sources:

http://www.bma-wellness.com/

http://www.psychologytoday.com/

 

Tai Chi and Addiction Recovery

Tai Chi and Addiction Recovery

When an addict enters into addiction recovery they free up a ton of time that they can use to devote to new and healthy activities. One of these activities is Tai Chi. Tai Chi not only brings physical benefits but can also help to improve mental well-being. There are even people who use Tai Chi as a type of spiritual path. Tai Chi is not enough for addiction recovery alone but it certainly can be a good activity to incorporate for a healthy addiction recovery.

What is tai chi?

Tai Chi originated in China and it can be translated into English as the supreme ultimate fist. Tai Chi was created for personal defense but it has now become more famous as an art that promotes mental health, spiritual health and fitness. It is believed that this kind of soft martial art was originally only made available to those in the Chinese society but these days it is practiced by people of all backgrounds around the globe. Tai Chi has been in existence for at least 700 years. Tai Chi is most famous for its flowing movements that are incorporated into forms. Most classes of Tai Chi will have a number of different elements that include:

  • Special warm up exercises that gently prepare the body for exercises
  • Chi Kung (also written Qigong) exercises that promote physical and mental health. These exercises are based on Chinese medicine and involve promoting the flow of Chi/Qi throughout the body.
  • Pushing hands is a two person technique where people get to experience the combat potential of Tai Chi. This is a type of sparring, and it is possible to enter push hands competitions where contestants attempt to push each other off balance to win.
  • Open hand forms include the flowing sets of movements most associated with this martial art. It can take many months to learn just one form and a lifetime to master it.
  • Weapons forms are sets of movements that also involve using a weapon. The common weapons used in Tai Chi are the sword, the staff and the saber. There are even weapons forms that rely on a fan or walking stick.

So how does tai chi and addiction recovery work together for health benefits?

Tai Chi can be a highly beneficial technique for people in recovery to take up. It will not only help them improve their physical health, but also their mental well-being. The meditative aspects of this art mean that people develop an increased ability to deal with life. This can be particularly beneficial when people are facing the challenges of early recovery. This is an activity that people can practice throughout their recovery, and it will continue to bring them benefits.

These are some of the many potential benefits associated with the practice of Tai Chi:

 

  • This gentle martial art is well-known for its ability to help people deal better with stress. There are many types of mental and physical illness associated with excessive stress, so anything that is able to remedy this is to be welcomed.
  • It is an activity that can bring health benefits to people of all ages. This is why it is now so common to see elderly people practicing this activity in parks around the world.
  • Tai Chi is an effective form of self-defense. The individual will hopefully never have to use the techniques to defend themselves, but knowing that they have this ability increases self-esteem and confidence.
  • It increases muscle strength in all parts of the body.
  • Tai Chi has been shown to improve balance. This is particularly beneficial to people as they get older because it helps to prevent falls.
  • It can be an effective technique for improving pain management caused by various chronic conditions.
  • This activity is often described as a moving meditation. This means that the individual will benefit from many of the benefits of more traditional meditation such as improved mental health.
  • Regular practice can increase energy levels and make people more mentally alert.
  • Although most forms of Tai Chi will be practiced slowly there can still be aerobic benefits from attending this type of class. This martial art is a path to lifelong physical fitness.
  • Tai Chi has been shown to benefit people dealing with several different health conditions including hypertension, arthritis, Parkinson’s disease, cardiovascular disease, stroke and insomnia.
  • Tai Chi can be a spiritual path. This activity is closely related to the Eastern spiritual traditions of Taoism and Buddhism. It is not necessary for people to embrace these philosophical traditions but some practitioners may choose to do this. Having some type of spiritual practice can be of great benefit to people in recovery from addiction.
  • One of the nice things about Tai Chi is that the emphasis is on technique over strength. This means that practically anyone can become good at this martial art if they are willing to put enough time and effort into the practice.
  • It is a superb activity for increasing upper- and lower-body flexibility. This can be of benefit to people of all ages, as it increases the potential range of movement. Those who practice the activity may still be able to touch their toes when they are in their 80s.